• Storage

    USB2 vs USB3 Hard drive adapters

    Is it worth buying a USB3 hard drive adapter compared to buying a USB2 adapter? Let’s break it down. USB2 can theoretically transfer data at 480 megabits per second (Mbps) or 60 megabytes per second (MB/s.) USB3 can theoretically transfer 5 gigabits per second (Gbps) or 625 megabytes per second (MB/s). Mechanical drives are limited by physics and usually can’t transfer faster then 180MB/s. SSDs are better at saturating the 3Gbps bus and newer ones are reaching the limits of the 6Gbps SATA bus. SATA revision 3.0’s speed limitation is 6 gigabit per second (Gbps) orĀ ~600 megabytes per second (MB/s). Intel’s 540 SSD (2.5″) can do 540 megabytes per second…

  • Storage

    Differences between 3.5″ and 2.5″ hard drives

    The main points are: 3.5″ hard drives are usually larger in capacity due to the size. 3.5″ drives are no more reliable then 2.5″. 2.5″ drives generally consume less power. 2.5″ occupy less space. You can pack more drives into a drive enclosure using 2.5″ then 3.5″ (Useful for servers) When choosing which one to use it may come down to budget. 3.5″ are usually cheaper per gb. Fun fact: 2.5″ hard drives became popular after 2007 in laptops when they were released in 1TB size. Prairie Tek released the 220 in 1988. It was the first 2.5″ hard drive designed for notebook market. It uses two platters to store…

  • Storage

    RAID Levels Explained

    Striping Striping is a technique to store data on the disk array. The contigous stream of data is divided into blocks, and blocks are written to multiple disks in a specific pattern. Striping is used with RAID levels 0, 5, 6, and 10. Block size is selected when the array is created. Typically, blocks are from 32KB to 128KB in size. Parity Parity: The use of parity bits is a common method of detecting errors in data transmission and storage. RAID 0 (Stripe set) Minimum of 2 or more drives If one or more drive fails the whole array is lost. Excellent performance (Blocks are striped) Good if you want…